• Dave Foord
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Adding file type icons to Moodle

In my previous post on ‘Adding files into a Moodle 2 content area’ I described how files can be added into the middle of text, so that they appear as links with a narration around them.

One downside of this, is that sometimes the links aren’t as obvious as they could be (depending on the theme being used and any personalisations to the CSS) – and also the student doesn’t know what type of file they are downloading – which when accessing on things like mobile devices, can be a useful piece of information.

Screenshot showing how icons are added before the hyperlinks to denote the file type So what I often do to make the links to files stand out , and to give the user an idea of what sort of file it is that they are downloading – I add the hyperlink on a separate line and add an icon before it to identify the file type. This improves the layout of the page, works really well on mobile devices and increases the usability considerably.

There are various sources of icons, your Moodle administrator should be able to locate the icons used by your system, so that they match – or I often use the following website, which helps search for creative commons icons:

Internet icon https://www.iconfinder.com/

Once you have your icons, you can keep adding the icon the same way that you add any other image, or another option which I have used with a few projects is to upload the icons to an area of webspace, then add this once to Moodle by adding an image by URL. I then set the ALT text (e.g. set this to “PowerPoint icon”, or “PDF icon”. I then go into the html view, and copy the piece of code that relates to that icon – and I paste this into a word document or similar. Then in the future when I want to re-use the icon, I can just go into the word document, copy the code for the desired icon, and paste this into the html editor in Moodle.

e.g. the code that I use to keep re-using the internet icon above looks something like:

Screen shot showing an example of the code can be added for each icon

 

 

This may sound a little complicated but it is actually a much quicker way of doing this, and you will know that everytime you add an icon, it will have the correct ALT text associated with it, which is really good for consistency and makes it a lot easier for a visually impaired learner to navigate around the area.

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Adding a file into a Moodle 2 content area

Many people that use Moodle will know how to add files directly into a Moodle course, which works fine for some situations, but there is a risk that one ends up with a long list of files appearing on the course page, without guidance to the learners as to what to do with them.

Personally I hate seeing Moodle (or any other VLE system) courses that look like this, as it doesn’t make for good teaching and learning (we don’t usually go into a teaching session, give the students 3 or 4 handouts, and then let them get on with it – we usually explain and talk to the learners what we want them to do with the resources).

So – rather than uploading files in a long list – what I like to do is to add a narration around the files, explaining to the learners what I want them to do with each of the files or resources that I am sharing with them. For this I need to choose a Moodle resource or activity type. If it is a very simple topic, I may add a ‘page’, other times I add a ‘book’ (which allows me to have multiple pages within the resource), or I could use a discussion ‘forum’, ‘lesson’, ‘Quiz’, or ‘assignment’. As long as whatever I choose gives me the WYSIWYG editor (the row of icons that looks a bit like a word processor), then I can use this technique.

The following video will take you through the process:

Part of the beauty of this technique, is it becomes very easy to move content around within the Moodle course – in that if I want to re-arrange my teaching order, I may have 1 link for the topic (which itself links to 4 or 5 other files) – I only have to move this one link and the files go with it, rather than having to move the 4 or 5 files in turn.

Another place where I use this technique a lot is with the assignment tool. If I want students to submit work through Moodle, and I am giving them an assignment brief (e.g. in the form of a word document) I can create an assignment within Moodle. Add the link to the assignment brief and any other required documents into the description, and then the learners are accessing the brief in the same place that they will be submitting their work – which is much neater than putting the briefs in one place and them submitting their work in another.