• Dave Foord
  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,641 other followers

  • Dave Foords Twitter

    • RT @greenfieldscc: after one loan player for our twos tomorrow @landrcl can anyone help? 5 days ago
    • Looking out the window and reminding my self that we are 3 days away from the ‘middle of summer’ 1 week ago
    • On my way to London, to look at potential of Moodle being used by a client to create a mobile friendly gamified sport development activity. 2 months ago
    • Heading up North, where I will be spending at least a week working on a huge Moodle migration project with a client. 3 months ago
    • RT @CharnwoodPE: 🏃🏻‍♂️🏃🏻‍♀️ - The 3 Charnwood medalist’s from the @dretsport Cross Country Cup! Harry Foord 1st 🥇, Colin Foord 2nd 🥈, and E… 3 months ago
  • Advertisements

How to use DSpeech to convert text to audio

DSpeech is a free piece of software which can be downloaded to a computer, or can run from a memory stick as part of the eduapps suite, and it allows a user to convert text to audio in MP3 format (so they can listen to it on computer or music player)

I like this piece of software, as it puts the learner in control of their adaptions rather than having to rely on someone else to either dictate for them, or to do the conversion, and this isn’t just useful for students with disabilities, but any learner who may not want to read a long piece of text, they can listen to it instead – and if they listen to it a few times (e.g. whilst doing something else) then they can pick up useful information that they would easily miss if just trying to read the information.

Advertisements

Accessible Apps – the best thing this year!


Accessible Apps

Originally uploaded by Dave Foord

A few weeks ago something called Accessible Apps was launched. This is a collection of free tools, that you have on a pen drive, so when you plug the pen drive into the computer, all of the tools are there to be used, without any problems with profiles, downloading software, permission etc. This is brilliant for learners with disabilities, but could be used by any learners – for example it has audacity on it – a program for creating sound recordings.

the only cost associated is the buying of the pen drives, which nowadays are very cheap, and if you buy in bulk can even be stamped with the college, university or school logo, so I think it is viable to give every learner one of these pen drives when they start a course. To download your own version of accessible apps, you will need a 2G memory pen (for the full package) and then go to http://www.rsc-ne-scotland.ac.uk/accessapps/