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Printing a YouTube video and it’s uses in education

This may sound like a daft title for a blog post, but it is possible to easily get an export of still images taken at regular intervals from any YouTube video, to create a storyboard of that video. These can either be printed or easily saved as a PDF, and then used electronically.

I don’t want to claim any credit for discovering or developing the technique – that needs to go to Amit Agarwal, who explains the technique on his blogpost ‘Do you want to print a YouTube video?

I am not sure what the legal issues are regarding copyright and this technique, but assuming that this is OK legally, then this simple technique could have a few really smart educational uses.

  1. As someone with a sports background, my first instinct was to use this for movement analysis, but the gap between the frames is too great for this to be realistic – but this could be used in a sports setting for crude notational analysis. E.g. if watching a game of say netball – you could count how many frames is team A in possession, how many frames is team B in possession, then work out the ratio, and you have a rough gauge of possession – compare this to the final score line and see if there is a correlation?
  2. In a subject like marketing, you could look at the output from a companies advert, and analyse how much of the 30 seconds is spent doing different things e.g. showing the product, showing the prize, repeating a key message etc.
  3. In teacher training, if a trainee teacher is filmed completing a microteach – this can be uploaded to YouTube as a private video (so no-one else sees it) you can then create the storyboard of printed images, and then analyse how their time is spent – e.g. how many frames are they writing on the board (with their back turned), how many frames are the students doing something etc. This could be a very effective tool – as counting frames on a piece of paper is much quicker and easier than trying to do the same with complex timings and starting and stopping clocks etc.
  4. In media studies – you can analyse the different types of shot (close up, mid shot, scene setting etc.) that are used in a sequence, and what effect this has on the message being conveyed.

Although in general I often like to move away from paper, and converting a media rich resource such as a video into a less rich image, seems to be a backward step, I think the ease of this technique and the power that it brings to carry out a basic analysis of the video is superb, and would be an excellent teaching activity.

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My first experiences with a VLE

In my last post, I talked about ‘What got me started in online learning?‘ with my first foray (in the late 1990s) into this area of work being the use of a joint drive to share files with learners, so that they complete self directed tasks – either assignments or other activities.

Although OK at the time, the obvious drawback of this technique was that the learners had to be in the college to be able to access the resources – what I wanted was a mechanism to give them access outside of college – the idea of learning anytime and anywhere! I spoke to the then college webmaster @KirstieC, who put me in touch with @Lesleywprice  who was at the time responsible for the online courses that the college was running, and for that they were using a VLE called LearningSpace by Lotus (although I think we referred to it as an MLE back then). I quickly saw the potential of this way of working, and set up areas on there to support my face to face teaching (which not many people were doing back then).

At first I added things to the VLE in a very Ad-hoc fashion, so there was no continuity, things took ages to upload, and in hindsight the software can only be described as a complete dog to use. However I persevered, and in my next year of teaching, I was a little cleverer – rather than adding files ad-hoc, I created a ‘template’ for each week or topic that I taught – this was a simple table that contained a box for key things such as a presentation, notes, web links, tasks for the students to do, a challenging question, and joke of the week (which I have blogged about previously – https://davefoord.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/using-bad-jokes-to-get-learners-to-engage-with-a-vle/ ).

All I did was copy this template then add the files and hyperlink them to the relevant area. This wasn’t rocket science but it made my life easier as was quicker and made the learners lives easier as they knew where to look for things, and in many ways I use the idea of creating a template to this day with my VLE work.

What I was doing at this time, was definitely revolutionary, as wasn’t the norm by any means, but there were still many problems:

  • Learners had difficulty getting logged in – for some reason the software was a bit clunky and flakey and sometimes students could login, other times they couldn’t.
  • Learners would get confused with login details – when this was set up we didn’t have single sign on, so learners had a different username and password to their college login, which confused them no end and if they changed one they assumed it changed both.
  • I had to manage enrolments – The system was such that users had to be manually set up on the system, which meant sending details to a techy who was very good at spelling their names wrong and associating them with the wrong courses, and often taking 2 weeks to do this. This caused huge headaches at the start of term, and put many off before they had got going.

Although there were many problems, and in reality I expect very few learners actually accessed the resources when off-site – this period was an important area for me, in my understanding of VLE use, thinking about the purpose of why to use the VLE, and recognising the real factors that stopped the VLE from working.

In my next post in this series, I will detail the next stage of my journey which was to stop using the ‘purchased’ VLE and instead make my own, to overcome the problems listed above.

Return to Washington Square Park, Aug 2009 - 69

The idea of a learner being able to learn where ever and when ever was best for them as per the picture above, always appealed to me as a teacher.

 

Why educators should use creative commons images?

I have regularly blogged about different tools to locate creative commons images, however I thought it would be useful for me to go into more information about ‘why’ we should use these – and not just from the logical response of staying on the right side of copyright law.

To start with, we need to understand what Creative Commons is. The following YouTube video explains this quite clearly. This is a New Zealand based video but the principle is the same in the UK and elsewhere.

Now onto the question of  why? I will be talking about this in an event next week, for which I have created an audio and an associated transcript (pdf) below.

Why it is important that educators use CC images (audio)

Why it is important that educators use CC images (transcript)

So – as well as the legal reason for using Creative Commons images, there is also the moral and educational reason – in that we need to prepare our current learners not just for their current studies, but also for the workplace beyond.

I was running some training at a primary school, where I introduced them to the idea of the Xpert attribution tool, and how this attaches the reference to the image, and if we get primary school children used to seeing correct referencing of images, when they get to secondary and FE/HE levels, they will be more familiar with this notion.

It is possible to be outstanding in an Ofsted inspection

I am really pleased that in the last few weeks, Walsall College have become the first FE college to get an overall grade of ‘Outstanding’ in a Ofsted inspection following the new inspection framework. I am pleased because this has raised the bar for other organisations to aim for, and proves that it is possible to achieve this magically (and at times mythical) level.

Over the last few years as I have worked with different organisations, it becomes quite clear that Ofsted is quite simply the single most important feature of an FE college, followed secondly by financial stability and thirdly by issues realting to the quality of teaching and learning. Personally I would prefer it if the 1st and 3rd items were to swap positions, but this is the reality that we live in. One thing that I have found interested is the different ways that senior management talk about Ofsted.

  • Some colleges that I have worked with, have quite clearly believed that getting an overall grade 1 (Outstanding) was in fact impossible, as if it was some kind of El Dorado that you could spend all life searching but never find, and as such they have accepted and aimed for an overall grade 2 (even if they talk publicly about aiming for grade 1). This strategy although not one that I personally like, did work when an overall grade 2 was the highest that had been achieved by anyone else.
  • The other strategy that I frequently come across (which I like even less) is the one where senior managers insist that all areas of the college have to work towards a grade 1, but without putting in any steps, strategy, guidance or leadership in how to get there, or without being able to tell people what grade 1 would actually look like, if they were to get there.

Personally I am driven by a desire to achieve quality, so I always aim high, so for me aiming for anything less than a grade 1 doesn’t interest me, however I recognise that to get there requires strong leadership, a coherent strategy, and most importantly communication up and down the hierarchy of the organisation so that all know what is expected and aimed for and also how will they know when they get there.

Now that Walsall College have achieved this, provides 2 advantages to everyone else:

  1. We now know that grade 1 is possible, so aiming for and being content with a grade 2 is no longer a feasible long term objective.
  2. We can look at what Walsall College have done (and other colleges that I anticipate will follow suit in the coming months) to get to this level, and use this to help shape the strategies and practices that are required.

If I use a sporting analogy, Back in the early 1950s a lot of people thought that it wasn’t physically possible for a human to run a 4 minute mile, until Roger Banister in 1954 famously achieved the feat. Once he had proved that it was possible to break this ‘speed barrier’ many people over the next few years achieved the same and bettered Roger’s time considerably. I am hoping that now that Walsall College have broken this ‘Ofsted Barrier’ that other colleges will follow suit accordingly.


Post edit on 10th April 2013

…and within a week of me writing this post, predicting that there will be other colleges following suit, Swindon College achieve the same feat. http://www.ofsted.gov.uk/provider/files/2203819/urn/130849.pdf

How to locate images on Wikimedia and embed into Moodle or Blackboard

There are lots of people that work in education that sadly think that Wikipedia is the work of the devil, and think that it will undermine academia as we know it, and should be banned at all costs. There are others that think Wikipedia is a wonderful source of information, and there is no point of looking elsewhere for facts.

Regardless of your viewpoint on Wikipedia (which hopefully is somewhere between the 2 extremes above), one aspect of it that is very useful, is that there is lots of high quality media (mainly images, but also videos and audio) available on Wikimedia – that can be easily (and legally) embedded into a VLE like Moodle or Blackboard.

As organisations scramble to set up online courses, the reality is that most people won’t have the time or money to generate their own high quality media – and I don’t think we need to, seeing as there is so much media out there that we can easily and legally use – the key is the academic structuring of this information and the asking of challenging and stimulating questions around this available media and information. e.g. the image below identifying a muscle in the human body – I couldn’t draw this myself, and it would be a waste of my time trying to.
Musculi coli sternocleidomastoideus

The video below shows how easy it is to find an image on wikimedia and embed it into a VLE like Moodle or Blackboard

Cropping a YouTube video before adding to Moodle

in April 2011 I blogged about how it is possible to use a service called TubeChop to crop a YouTube video and then embed it into PowerPoint, and this has been one of my most viewed posts on my blog.

I used to use TubeChop as well when embedding a video into a VLE such as Moodle or Blackboard, but have found that it hasn’t always worked, and doesn’t work on iphones/ipads etc as it plays as flash only – so I have found another far more reliable way of cropping a YouTube video before adding it to Moodle, by simply editing the embed code for the video. This technique works really well when accessing videos via Moodle on a mobile device, which I think is going to become a massive feature in the next few years.

The video below will show how to do this (apologies for the poorer than usual sound quality)

In summary:

  1. When we select the embed code we untick all of the option boxes below it.
  2. We copy and paste the embed code into something where we can edit it (e.g. word, notepad)
  3. We find the text “rel=0” and after it add “;start=xxx;end=yyy” where xxx is the number of seconds at which you wish to start the video, and yyy is the number of seconds at which you wish to end the video.

There are lots of uses for this technique – often when watching a YouTube video, you don’t want to show all of it, so cropping the bit that you want makes the process more efficient. You can also use videos as part of Moodle Quizzes, either in the question, the answer choices (it using multiple choice) or in the feedback. So if you find a video of something relevant to your area, you can crop it to just play a few seconds – then ask a question based on what the student has just seen, or have cropped videos in each of the answer choices (e.g. question could be which of the following videos shows the correct technique for ….) then show 4 videos clips, with one correct and 3 incorrect.

I am also a big fan of when using video, we need to instruct the learners what they are doing with it – e.g. asking them to observe something in particular, or critique the video, or watch the video then answer these questions… By breaking a video up using the cropping idea, we can easily add these textual instructions between the clips, rather than just dumping a whole video on the VLE for them to watch without a clear purpose.

This technique works really well with anything that allows iframes to be embedded (e.g. Moodle). It therefore may not work with Blackboard (in which case TubeChop may be still required). I also haven’t too date worked out how to get this to work in PowerPoint – so again for that I am stilling using TubeChop.

 

The legacy of the paralympics on education

I missed most of the Olympics as was on holiday, but I watched as much of the Paralympics as possible, and I (like many others) have been blown away with the standard and the excitement that it has brought, but what has really pleased me is the media coverage (and positive media coverage) that it has achieved. When I taught, one my main subjects was around the area of ‘disability sport’ – and I remember during the 2000 Sydney Olympics the TV coverage was something like a very superficial 30minutes each evening, showing the main sports of athletics, swimming and wheelchair basketball and sports like boccia and goalball getting next to no coverage.

12 years later and channel 4 has broadcast over 400 hours of coverage, showing all sports, all athletes, and the programme ‘The last leg‘ I thought was superb, as it highlighted that we don’t have to be nervous discussing disabled people, it doesn’t matter if we occasionally get the terminology wrong (as long as it isn’t offensive) and disabled people don’t need to be wrapped in cotton wool, and treated like innocent kids all their lives.

So what impact will this have on our education system?

There is a huge opportunity for education to deliver the legacy that the games set out to create. Hopefully the physical education agenda will be addressed. There have regular media debates about the amount of PE on the curriculum, which I hope does increase, but we can also look at the attitude of PE. In the last 15 or so years there has been a move to widen sporting participation to all, which has unfortunately been translated into seriously reducing the competitive element of sport. I think there is a need for both, which the Paralympics to me has shown – many of the disabled athletes that were interviewed, echoed that competing (and winning) is what drives them and how that is an essential part of their life, and I hope a balance of meeting the needs of driven students can be met along with those that don’t like sport.

Outside of the PE agenda, there are also lessons to learn – watching the blind athletes playing football was amazing, and showed that a lack of vision does not render an individual incapable, similarly a lack of limbs is not a barrier to some amazing swims, jumps, throws and runs, and the archery competitor that used his feet to hold the bow, and his mouth to release the arrow shows the ability for some disabled individuals to find innovative ways to overcome perceived barriers. Hopefully when a disabled individual enters an educational establishment, their ability and potential isn’t prejudged by someone, that then holds them back from that point forth. The problem with the current model, is disabled students are assessed by an ‘expert’ within the organisation who comes up with a support plan identifying what adaptations are needed, and although this works for most, there are many people that end up with the wrong type or level of support, which rather than helping them, holds them back. Hopefully students, parents, carers and teachers will have the confidence to challenge these support plans if they think they need improving.

From a teaching perspective – there is an opportunity to better meet the needs of disabled learners. I have long preached the notion of inclusivity, which is rather than creating non-accessible practices and then using methods to overcome them – instead we look at what we are doing and create resources and practices that can be easily adapted (ideally by the student themselves). I know the CPD budgets are currently tight within organisations, but I think investing in CPD in this area would be a worthwhile investment, as learning inclusive techniques, will save the tutor time, will raise the standards of teaching for all learners, could reduce the learner support costs, and would help to produce a world beating education system.

One of the best training programmes for educators that would cover this, is the ITQ for accessible IT practice which I have been running for a few organisations over the last 18 months, and I think offers excellent value for money, as well as giving staff the opportunity to gain a recognised qualification.

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