Trimming and Embedding a YouTube Video into PowerPoint

I have blogged many times in the past about things to do with PowerPoint, including how to embed a YouTube video, or how to use TubeChop to embed a YouTube video.

In more recent versions of PowerPoint (2013 and 2016), the ability to embed a YouTube video has been made easier, and the following video will take you through the steps:

Although easier to do than in the past, this technique has been unreliable for some people in some organisations, so I always recommend to people to paste the video’s URL onto the slide somewhere as a live link, so if this doesn’t work, you have the fall back of simply accessing the video via the YouTube website.

This technique is showing how to embed the video – this means you still need access to the Internet when viewing the presentation, and it won’t work if the organisation blocks YouTube.

This technique replaces the older method of using the shockwave flash object, or using TubeChop to trim the video.

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Using hyperlinks within PowerPoint

In an earlier blog post, I linked a series of screencasts showing how to use drawing tools within PowerPoint to create a well formatted diagram such as a flowchart, I then showed how to use animations with this diagram.

This next sequence of screencasts will go through the principles of hyperlinking and how the diagram created earlier can be converted into a highly effective, highly versatile learning object.

The first video shows what is possible

The second video shows how to add a simple hyperlink to a presentation

The third video shows how to link to other files, including how to link to a specific part within the file (e.g. to a certain page in a Word document, a certain slide in another PowerPoint presentation or a certain sheet in Excel)

The forth video shows how to link to a different slide within the same presentation. In this case I am linking from the diagram produced in an earlier series, but the principles work with text, or photos.

The fifth video shows a similar technique to the previous video, but the diagram remains visible at all times, which when created correctly looks very professional.

The sixth video shows how to add hotspots over a photo, so when you click on parts of the photo, it takes you to a slide based on what you clicked on.

By applying the skills learnt in the above sequence in different ways, it is possible to create very effective, engaging learning objects.

The videos above although produced by myself belong to the JISC RSC SE