• Dave Foord
  • Enter your email address to subscribe to this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 1,641 other followers

  • Dave Foords Twitter

    • RT @greenfieldscc: after one loan player for our twos tomorrow @landrcl can anyone help? 5 days ago
    • Looking out the window and reminding my self that we are 3 days away from the ‘middle of summer’ 1 week ago
    • On my way to London, to look at potential of Moodle being used by a client to create a mobile friendly gamified sport development activity. 2 months ago
    • Heading up North, where I will be spending at least a week working on a huge Moodle migration project with a client. 3 months ago
    • RT @CharnwoodPE: 🏃🏻‍♂️🏃🏻‍♀️ - The 3 Charnwood medalist’s from the @dretsport Cross Country Cup! Harry Foord 1st 🥇, Colin Foord 2nd 🥈, and E… 3 months ago
  • Advertisements

Using ‘game’ and activity templates in education

This is idea 1, in a series on ‘putting the fun back into fundamental learning‘.

One of the changes to the Inspections framework within FE within the UK, is that inspectors are now looking to see if students are enjoying themselves whilst they are learning. This is actually proving a really big challenge for some educators.

One way that technology can be used to bring an element of ‘fun’ back into the learning process is by using game type activities as part of the process. I am not talking about high-tec immersive type games, but much simpler, types of activity, were the tutor enters the basic information about their subject and the computer converts this into an activity. We are lucky that there are many different game and activity templates out there, so we can use a wide variety in our teaching and learning (learners will quickly get bored of doing lots of crosswords, or lots of multi-choice questions).

Some people think that games shouldn’t be used in education as they question the learning value of them, but one thing that a good ‘game type activity’ can do, is encourage repetition, which for learning basic facts, is recognised as an essential part of the learning process, yet one that is hard to achieve in FE and HE.

I used to use QUIA (see below for details) a lot in my teaching, and because I taught sport science students (who are naturally competitive) they would often repeat activities many times to try and get a better score (especially if I did the activity first to set a target) – this for me was a great way to cover key information, e.g. names of bones, muscle actions, definitions of physical terms etc.

Here I will describe 3 examples of web based tools that can be used for this purpose


Quia

http://www.quia.com/ is an excellent resource, although it does have a cost attached to it of $50 per year if you want to create your own activities.

  • You can create activities, where you enter the information, and it turns that into a game type activity for you. Activities include battleships, matching pairs, wordsearches, ordered lists etc.
  • There are quizzes, which even has built in tracking so that you can track which students have done what.
  • There are survey options which are easy to use and easy to analyse afterwards, and many other options.

I personally think that the $50 per year is worth paying due to the amount of time that it can save and the quality of the final products, but even if you don’t pay, there are many activities that are on their site which have been shared by tutors which you can do for free, if you go to http://www.quia.com/shared/ you will see the list of subjects covered, then looking into any of them will reveal thousands of created resources, that you can use with learners, by just copying and sharing the URL.


StudyStack

http://www.studystack.com/ works on pairs of information (e.g. capital city and country, author and book, psychologist and theory etc). You can either use an activity that has created by someone else, or create your own for free. Once created the pairs of information are turned into various game types, including anagrams, crosswords etc, but also simple kinesthetic type games such as hungry bug, which is like the game snakes that used to appear on early mobile phones. Young people in particular will sometimes play these retro type games for hours at times, so if we can use this for education then brilliant. The output isn’t a polished as QUIA, and the site does have advertising on it, but for ease of use and to provide variety, and being free is an excellent site. An example of a hungry bug activity created by someone else is http://www.studystack.com/hungrybug-49086 – if you then click on the icons below the activity you can play different games with the same sets of words.


Jigsaw Planet

http://www.jigsawplanet.com/ is a web based jigsaw creating site. You can either do one of their preloaded jigsaws, or more likely we can create our own. All we need to do is upload an image, select the number of pieces, and the piece shape and it will convert this into a jigsaw for us. So for example if we wanted the students to learn a table of important but uninteresting information, we could convert the table into an image (by just doing a print screen, or using a tool like Snippy to capture a region of the screen containing the table), upload this to Jigsaw Planet and away you go. An Example of this, using a simple table of information based on countries can be found at http://www.jigsawplanet.com/?rc=play&pid=29a2685d793d


There are many other tools out there, but these are 3 web based ones (and therefore easy to manage) that I particularly like.

Advertisements

Online jigsaw creator – JigsawPlanet

I am starting to do some work with a local nursery who have been given some money for IT kit and training, and they are hiring me to help with the training part of it. One thing that they have invested in is interactive whiteboards, and something that I think will be very good, is doing jigsaw puzzles, with images that they have taken (e.g. of toys, things around the nursery).

A website that will create these puzzles is www.jigsawplanet.com – you can choose different nubmers of pieces and different piece shapes, and something that I really like is that it gives you embed code, so it is very easy to embed them into a blog, wiki or other website, some examples are below. Obvioulsy when working with the nursery it wouldn’t be a good idea to take images of the kids and then put them on the website.

A 12 piece puzzle, using ‘square’ pieces

A 20 piece puzzle using curved pieces